canvass


canvass
can|vass [ˈkænvəs] v
[Date: 1500-1600; Origin: canvass 'to throw up in the air from a canvas sheet as a game or punishment' (16-17 centuries), from canvas]
1.) [I and T]
to try to persuade people to support a political party, politician, plan etc by going to see them and talking to them, especially when you want them to vote for you in an election
Candidates from all three parties were out canvassing in Darlington today.
canvass for
Chapman spent the rest of May canvassing for votes.
The US has been canvassing support from other Asian states.
2.) [I and T]
to ask people about something in order to get their opinion or to get information
Police canvassed the neighborhood, but didn't find any witnesses.
3.) [T]
to talk about a problem, suggestion etc in detail
A committee was set up to canvass the city's educational options .
>canvasser n
>canvass n

Dictionary of contemporary English. 2013.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Canvass — Can vass, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {canvassed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Canvassing}.] [OF. Canabasser to examine curiously, to search or sift out; properly, to sift through canvas. See {Canvas}, n.] 1. To sift; to strain; to examine thoroughly; to… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • canvass — can·vass also can·vas / kan vəs/ vb vassed also vased, vass·ing, also, vas·ing vt 1 a: to examine in detail; specif: to examine (votes) officially for authenticity b: to make the subject of discussion or debate …   Law dictionary

  • Canvass — Can vass, n. 1. Close inspection; careful review for verification; as, a canvass of votes. Bacon. [1913 Webster] 2. Examination in the way of discussion or debate. [1913 Webster] 3. Search; exploration; solicitation; systematic effort to obtain… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Canvass — Can vass, v. i. To search thoroughly; to engage in solicitation by traversing a district; as, to canvass for subscriptions or for votes; to canvass for a book, a publisher, or in behalf of a charity; commonly followed by for. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • canvass — can‧vass [ˈkænvəs] verb [transitive] MARKETING 1. to ask people about something in order to get their opinion or to get information: • People were canvassed for their opinions on the scheme. canvasser noun [countable] : • You may get a brief… …   Financial and business terms

  • canvass — c.1500, from CANVAS (Cf. canvas) and probably meaning, originally, to toss in a canvas sheet, hence to shake out, examine carefully (1520s); to solicit votes (1550s); though to sift through canvas also has been proposed as the basic metaphor. The …   Etymology dictionary

  • canvass — [v] poll; discuss issues agitate, analyze, apply, argue, campaign, check, check over, consult, debate, dispute, electioneer, examine, inspect, investigate, review, run, scan, scrutinize, sift, solicit, study, survey, ventilate; concepts… …   New thesaurus

  • canvass — ► VERB 1) visit (someone) in order to seek their vote in an election. 2) question (someone) to find out their opinion. 3) Brit. propose (an idea or plan) for discussion. ► NOUN ▪ an act of canvassing. DERIVATIVES canvasser noun …   English terms dictionary

  • canvass — [kan′vəs] vt. [< CANVAS < ? use of canvas for sifting] 1. to examine or discuss in detail; look over carefully 2. to go through (places) or among (people) asking for (votes, opinions, orders, etc.) vi. to try to get votes, orders, etc.;… …   English World dictionary

  • canvass — I UK [ˈkænvəs] / US verb Word forms canvass : present tense I/you/we/they canvass he/she/it canvasses present participle canvassing past tense canvassed past participle canvassed 1) a) [intransitive/transitive] to ask many people in an area for… …   English dictionary


Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.